About

Mission of the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association (CHWA): Strengthen, Promote and Maintain our Successful Historic Downtown District.

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Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association is a Washington State Main Street entity under the Washington State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation and National Main Street Center (a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation). Coupeville is Washington’s second oldest town, founded in 1853. Along with many historic towns in Washington and around the country we are working to preserve Coupeville history.  

Over the past 35 years, the National Main Street Center has led the development of a national network of over 2,000 historic downtowns and neighborhood commercial districts with special historic and economic needs.

The people who make up the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association are local citizens who share passion for history and willing to donate, engage, or advocate for Coupeville at a local level.

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As a catalyst for economic growth and community pride, CHWA is comprised of local businesses, building and homeowners, organizations and community partners.

We also rely on grants and volunteer hours.

Find out more by emailing us.

At CHWA we strive to create a cohesive and positive environment for business and property owners, local citizens, visitors, customers, historians, potential investors and new businesses, based on Coupeville’s unique HISTORY, location and downtown attributes.

The eight guiding principles and four points of the Main Street approach work together to build a sustainable and complete community revitalization effort.

8 Guiding Principles 

• Comprehensive. A single project cannot revitalize a downtown or commercial neighborhood. An ongoing series of initiatives is vital to build community support and create lasting progress.

• Incremental. Small projects make a big difference. They demonstrate that “things are happening” on Main Street and hone the skills and confidence the program will need to tackle more complex projects.

• Self-Help. The state can provide valuable direction and technical assistance, but only local leadership can breed long-term success by fostering and demonstrating community involvement and commitment to the revitalization effort.

• Public/Private Partnership. Every local Main Street program needs the support and expertise of both the public and private sectors. For an effective partnership, each must recognize the strengths and weaknesses of the other.

• Identifying and Capitalizing on Existing Assets. Unique offerings and local assets provide the solid foundation for a successful Main Street initiative.

• Quality. From storefront design to promotional campaigns to special events, quality must be instilled in the organization.

• Change. Changing community attitudes and habits is essential to bring about a commercial district renaissance. A carefully planned Main Street program will help shift public perceptions and practices to support and sustain the revitalization process.

• Action Oriented. Frequent visible changes in the look and activities of the commercial district will reinforce the perception of positive change. Small, but dramatic, improvements early in the process will remind the community that the revitalization effort is underway

4 Points

• Design: enhances the look and feel of the commercial district. Historic building rehabilitation, street and alley clean-up, landscaping, street furniture, signage, visual merchandising and lighting all improve the physical image of the downtown as a quality place to shop, work, walk, invest in, and live. Design improvements result in a reinvestment of public and private dollars to downtown.

• Organization: involves building a Main Street framework that is well represented by business and property owners, bankers, citizens, historic preservationists, entrepreneurs, public officials, chambers of commerce, and other local economic development organizations. Everyone must work together to renew downtown. A strong organization provides the structure and stability to build and maintain a long-term effort.

• Economic Sustainability: creates excitement and vibrancy downtown. Street festivals, parades, retail events, and image development campaigns are some of the ways Main Street provides education on what’s downtown and encourages customer traffic. Promotion involves marketing an enticing image to shoppers, investors, and visitors.

Economic Restructuring: involves analyzing current market forces to develop long-term solutions. Recruiting new businesses, creatively converting unused space for new uses, and sharpening the competitiveness of Main Street’s traditional merchants are examples of economic restructuring activities.

OUR Quarterly Meetings are Held at the Coupeville Rec Hall 

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2017 Meetings – January 19, April 20, July 20, October 19 at the Coupeville Rec Hall – 901 NW Alexander St, Coupeville, WA 98239 map

Breakfast Served

We’ll be glad to see you.  

CHWA membership is open to anyone with an interest in the preservation and a love of Coupeville and its history. Visit our Contact Us page to inquire on membership.  

Membership dues are $40.00 per year (0.1 percent of a penny per day).  

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Visit us right now through this video.  Credit Whidbey and Camano Islands youtube site.

COUPEVILLE FARMERS MARKET is Open Every Saturday April through October 

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