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Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve will receive a million dollars in preservation grants from the state of Washington THANKS to Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, the Washington State Legislature, the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, and Governor Jay Inslee.

Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve Manager Kristen Griffin Press Release – PDF

Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP) announces recipients of Ebey’s Reserve Preservation Grants

Whidbey News Times article for Times subscribers

We couldn’t be happier for the recipients, and what these Ebey’s Reserve Preservation Grants mean to the furthering preservation of some of our state’s oldest buildings.  These buildings are still standing today because they were preserved in the past and thankfully continue to be preserved today.

This, our celebratory blog piece about the grant and distribution, includes images and links to the history of many of the buildings and a hearty thanks to all those who worked hard to have the preservation grants brought to the Reserve and our historic town. We include old images of the buildings as a testament to the years they’ve stood and the importance of historic preservation.

Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve grant money within the Reserve and the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation’s Main Street Program’s catchment of the Historic Waterfront Association

The circa 1855 Alexander Blockhouse.

Part of the Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum the Alexander Blockhouse receives 2,300.00 to clean and preserve the cedar shake roof. Block House history. Photo Credit: Private collection of Lillian Huffstettler.

#1 Front Street

The circa 1859 and 1866 Haller House, property of the non-profit Historic Whidbey, was awarded $196,940 for structural stabilization and foundation work, and rehabilitation of historic doors and windows. Haller House history.

1859 for first structure. 1866 for larger addition.

After sitting empty for many years, raccoons were the main residents of the Haller House until just recently. The house was purchased and is being restored by Historic Whidbey’s and their Heritage Center Project. To find out more about the restoration of Haller and Heritage Center visit Historic Whidbey’s site.

#8 Front St. 

The circa 1860 Whidbey Mercantile building (now Toby’s) receives $19,022 for roof replacement. This is one of the oldest commercial building left within the Reserve. one of the oldest remaining commercial buildings in the Reserve. History of #8

Image circa 1903. Image Credit: Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum.

#12 Front St.

Circa 1886 and originally the Blowers and Kineth building (where Lower Loft Eatery, Sea Bre’s Yarns and Far From Normal operate today) was awarded $78,253 for structural stabilization and foundation work, siding repair and rehabilitation of historic windows. History of #12

Image: Sack race during the Penn Cove Water Festival 1920’s. Bowers and Kineth building first in line. Photo Credit: Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum

#16 Front St.

The 1916 Benson’s Confectionary (now Kingfisher Bookstore) receives $21,500 to rehabilitate and replace historic doors and windows. History of #16

Photo Credit: Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum

#22 Front St.

The 1899 Terry’s Dryer/Gillespie Livery building (now the home of Vail’s Wine Shop, Front Street Realty, Windjammer Custom Framing and office of Therapist Jennifer R. Ayers) received $25,623 for structural stabilization and foundation work, and paint to preserve the weathered façade. History of #22

Photo Credit: Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum.

#26 Front St. The much beloved Coupeville Wharf, circa 1905, was awarded $303,000 for structural stabilization and foundation work to replace the building’s roof. Wharf history.

The Wharf is the property of and operated by the Port of Coupeville. 

Image: 1910’s. Credit: Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum.

Other recipients within the Reserve 

 

Circa 1905 building once known as Pat’s Place (now the Tyee Restaurant and Bar) awarded $21,600 for structural stabilization and foundation work. Photo Credit: Unknown. Assumption is Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum or Washington State Archives

 

 

Circa 1907 rustic log Whid-Isle Inn (Captain Whidbey Inn), awarded $99,427 to replace the cedar shake roof.

Image Credit: Captain Whidbey Inn Collection

 

 

Circa 1889 Zylstra House received $36,665 to rehabilitate historic windows and replace a failing roof. Photo credit Washington State Dept of Archeology and Historic Preservation.

 

 

 

Circa’s 1898 and 1968 Fort Casey State Park’s Battery Worth Guns were awarded $145,000 to restore exterior surfaces. Photo Credit: Fort Casey State Park.

 

 

Circa 1894 Coupeville Methodist Church at 608 North Main Street awarded $30,670 for rehabilitation of its historic bell tower.

Photo: Assumption is Island County Historical Society Archives and Museum or Washington State Archives

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU!

Settled in 1850’s Coupeville is the second oldest town in Washington. It was incorporated in 1910.

Find out more about Coupeville though the 1998 study “How Coupeville Grew”, a joint effort of the Town of Coupeville, the Ebey’s National Historical Reserve Trust Board and the National Park Service – PDF

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